Wednesday, November 28, 2012
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Wednesday, October 17, 2012

nybg:

Hip hip hooray! It’s Ada Lovelace Day!

As a woman sitting at the intersection of computing and science I have deep respect for Ada Lovelace. Who is Ada? She is widely understood to be the world’s first computer programmer, way back in the 19th century. She was also the daughter of the poet Lord Byron. Because her mother feared Ada would inherit some of her father’s “artistic” temperament, she pushed the young Ada to study the natural world and the science and math behind it. In 1833 Ada was introduced to mathematician Charles Babbage. It was under Babbage’s tutelage that Ada developed an article which contained several computer programs. These notes remained theoretical until they served as inspiration for Alan Turing’s work on the first modern computers in the 1940s.

Okay, so now you know who Ada Lovelace is, but why am I yammering on about her? Because Ada Lovelace is inspirational, she should stand at the head of the class for any woman—young, old, or in the middle—who hopes to leave her mark on this world in science, technology, engineering, or math. Ada, in my mind, is right up there with Elizabeth Britton, co-founder of The New York Botanical Garden as a true inspiration. Elizabeth was a scientist and teacher. She was an early advocate for the planting of native plants in order to maintain healthy ecosystems. She traveled around the world, wrote hundreds of scientific papers, described new genera and species, and was the only woman amongst the 25 charter members of the Botanical Society of America.

Both Ada and Elizabeth set out to blaze their own trails, societal norms be damned! Do you know a girl or young woman struggling to hold her own in the STEM fields? Tell her about Ada, tell her about Elizabeth, and tell her to keep going. The world needs more women pushing these boundaries and more role models like Ada and Elizabeth. ~AR

designcloud:

Apex Predator Shoe by Mariana Fantich and Dominic Young

British artists Mariana Fantich and Dominic Young have re-interpreted the classic Oxford shoe by replacing the rubber soles with 1,050 teeth dentures. The “Apex Predator Shoe” visually addresses the parallels between social evolution and evolution in the natural world. Nature as model or nature as a threat. These shoes are designed for predators with no predators of their own, residing at the top of their food chain.

(Source: cosascool)

treehugger:

© Richard Shilling 
Yesterday, Jaymi’s lovely apple harvest photo got me thinking about this piece by Richard Shilling, which is part of his Land Art collection. Much of Shilling’s work is simple, but profound, finding beauty and form in nature. I’m always drawn to these sort of chromatic spectrum sculptures, whether they be made with a series of fall leaves or multi-colored carrots or Shilling’s apples. In every case, they remind me of the wondrous variety found in nature.
(via Photo of the Day: Richard Shilling’s Apples : TreeHugger)

treehugger:

© Richard Shilling 

Yesterday, Jaymi’s lovely apple harvest photo got me thinking about this piece by Richard Shilling, which is part of his Land Art collection. Much of Shilling’s work is simple, but profound, finding beauty and form in nature. I’m always drawn to these sort of chromatic spectrum sculptures, whether they be made with a series of fall leaves or multi-colored carrots or Shilling’s apples. In every case, they remind me of the wondrous variety found in nature.

(via Photo of the Day: Richard Shilling’s Apples : TreeHugger)

climateadaptation:

How climate deniers (‘skeptics’ is a misnomer I believe) see climate change evidence vs. how realists see it. For an explanation of the escalator graph, visit Skeptical Science. Skeptical Science has a ton of Climate 101 articles. They’re easy to read, are well sourced, and written by authorities in the field.

climateadaptation:

How climate deniers (‘skeptics’ is a misnomer I believe) see climate change evidence vs. how realists see it. For an explanation of the escalator graph, visit Skeptical Science. Skeptical Science has a ton of Climate 101 articles. They’re easy to read, are well sourced, and written by authorities in the field.